11th Independent Battery Light Artillery (Veteran)

Nickname: Havelock Battery

Left state: January 17, 1862
Mustered out: June 13, 1865.

The following is taken from New York in the War of the Rebellion, 11th ed. Frederick Phisterer. Albany: J. B. Lyon Company, 1912.

Captain Albert Von Puttkammer received authority October 26, 1861, to recruit a battery— Independent Battery, Flying Artillery; it was recruited under the auspices of the Young Men's Christian Association at Albany, and there mustered in the service of the United States for three years. About the same time another battery was recruited by Capt. Robert C. Warmington at Ashtabula, Ohio, and Buffalo. These two batteries, incomplete, were consolidated January 15-, 1862, and the nth Battery formed. At the expiration of its term of service, the men entitled thereto were discharged and the battery retained in service. It left the State with Albert Von Puttkammer as Captain, January 17, 1862, and served at and near Washington, D. C., from that time; in the Reserve Corps, Army of Virginia, from June 26, 1862; in the 3d Division, 3d Corps, Army of the Potomac, from November, 1862; in the Artillery Brigade, 3d Corps, from May, 1863; in the 4th Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, from May 12, 1863; with Battery K, 1st N. Y. Volunteer Artillery, from June, 1863; in the 2d Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, from January, 1864; in the 3d Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, from April, 1864; in Artillery Brigade, 2d Corps, from May 16, 1864; with the 1st Division, in August, 1864; and in the Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, from May, 1865. Commanded by Capt. George W. Davey, the battery was honorably discharged and mustered out June 13, 1865, at Albany, having during its service lost by death, killed in action, 6 enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 2 enlisted men; of disease and other causes, 13 enlisted men; total, 21; of whom I died in the hands of the enemy.

The following is taken from The Union army: a history of military affairs in the loyal states, 1861-65 -- records of the regiments in the Union army -- cyclopedia of battles -- memoirs of commanders and soldiers, Volume II: New York, Maryland, West Virginia and Ohio. Madison, WI: Federal Pub. Co., 1908.

Eleventh Independent Battery.—Capts., Albert Von Putkammer, John E. Burton, James T. Wyatt, George W. Davy. The ilth, the Havelock battery, was formed on Jan. 15, 1862, by the consolidation of two incomplete organizations—the independent battery, Flying Artillery, recruited at Albany under the auspices of the Young Men's Christian Association, and there mustered into the U. S. service for three years, and the battery recruited about the same time by Capt. Robert C. Warmington at Ashtabula, Ohio, and Buffalo, N. Y. The battery continued in service after the expiration of its term as a veteran organization. It left the state Jan. 17, 1862, commanded by Capt. Von Putkammer, and was stationed at Washington for a number of months. Attached to the reserve corps, Army of Virginia, it served in Pope's Virginia campaign, losing 2T, wounded and captured at Manassas and Bull Run bridge. In Nov., 1862, it moved with the 3d corps to Falmouth, where it joined Burnside's army, and later took part in the battle of Fredericksburg without loss. In the artillery brigade of the same corps it was heavily engaged at Chancellorsville, losing 11 killed, wounded and missing; at Gettysburg, where it fought attached to Battery K, 1st N. Y. artillery, it lost S men wounded. It was active in the Mine Run campaign, and in 1864 it was engaged in all the battles of Grant's campaign from the Wilderness to Petersburg. It took part in the first assault on the works of Petersburg, after which it was engaged at the Weldon railroad, Deep Bottom and Strawberry Plains. Its loss was 4 killed and wounded at Cold Harbor, 3 at the assault on Petersburg, and i at Strawberry Plains. In 1865 it was engaged in the last demonstrations on Petersburg and in the Appomattox campaign was engaged at White Oak ridge, Deatonsville road, Farmville and Appomattox Court House, but sustained no losses. The battery was mustered out on June 13, 1865, at Albany, under command of Capt. Davy. Its loss during service was 6 killed, 2 died of wounds received in action, and 13 of disease and other causes.Eleventh Independent Battery.—Capts., Albert Von Putkammer, John E. Burton, James T. Wyatt, George W. Davy. The ilth, the Havelock battery, was formed on Jan. 15, 1862, by the consolidation of two incomplete organizations—the independent battery, Flying Artillery, recruited at Albany under the auspices of the Young Men's Christian Association, and there mustered into the U. S. service for three years, and the battery recruited about the same time by Capt. Robert C. Warmington at Ashtabula, Ohio, and Buffalo, N. Y. The battery continued in service after the expiration of its term as a veteran organization. It left the state Jan. 17, 1862, commanded by Capt. Von Putkammer, and was stationed at Washington for a number of months. Attached to the reserve corps, Army of Virginia, it served in Pope's Virginia campaign, losing 2T, wounded and captured at Manassas and Bull Run bridge. In Nov., 1862, it moved with the 3d corps to Falmouth, where it joined Burnside's army, and later took part in the battle of Fredericksburg without loss. In the artillery brigade of the same corps it was heavily engaged at Chancellorsville, losing 11 killed, wounded and missing; at Gettysburg, where it fought attached to Battery K, 1st N. Y. artillery, it lost S men wounded. It was active in the Mine Run campaign, and in 1864 it was engaged in all the battles of Grant's campaign from the Wilderness to Petersburg. It took part in the first assault on the works of Petersburg, after which it was engaged at the Weldon railroad, Deep Bottom and Strawberry Plains. Its loss was 4 killed and wounded at Cold Harbor, 3 at the assault on Petersburg, and i at Strawberry Plains. In 1865 it was engaged in the last demonstrations on Petersburg and in the Appomattox campaign was engaged at White Oak ridge, Deatonsville road, Farmville and Appomattox Court House, but sustained no losses. The battery was mustered out on June 13, 1865, at Albany, under command of Capt. Davy. Its loss during service was 6 killed, 2 died of wounds received in action, and 13 of disease and other causes.

11thIndBatGuidon2004-31.jpg

11th Independent Battery, NY Volunteers | Guidons | Civil War

The NYS Battle Flag Collection includes two guidons attributed to the 11th Independent Battery, New York Volunteers. Each silk, swallowtail guidon…

11thIndBatNational2005.0117.jpg

11th Independent Battery, NY Volunteers | National Flag | Civil War

The New York State Battle Flag Collection includes one national flag attributed to the 11th Independent Battery, New York Volunteers. This printed,…

CSA_ANV1995.0295.jpg

14th Alabama Infantry (probable) | ANV Battle Flag | Civil War

On July 24, 1866, Lieutenant G.N.P. Gale, 11th Independent Battery, NY Volunteers, donated a Confederate battle flag reportedly taken near Clover…

Other Resources

This is meant to be a comprehensive list. If, however, you know of a resource that is not listed below, please send an email to ng.ny.nyarng.list.historians@mail.mil with the name of the resource and where it is located. This can include photographs, letters, articles and other non-book materials. Also, if you have any materials in your possession that you would like to donate, the museum is always looking for items specific to New York's military heritage. Thank you.

Barraniger, George D. George D. Barringer Letters.
One letter was written in 1899. The remainder were written in 1864 - 1865.
Donated by Ed Connolly of Wynantskill, NY.
Collection arranged by Mackenzie Waterson.

Gore, William B.. The autobiography of William B. Gore : diary, 1863 Oct.-1866 June
Abstract: Diary kept by Gore mainly while a private serving in the 11th Havelock Battery during the Civil War (1863-1866). Writes of personal activities, details of travels, and camp incidents in a narrative form to make it seem more like an autobiography than a diary; his service included much time in Virginia. He also writes several pages of biographical and genealogical background on himself.
Located at New York School of Interior Design. Access: open to qualified researchers at The New-York Historical Society./ This collection is owned by The New-York Historical Society. Permission to publish materials must be obtained in writing from the Library Director of The New-York Historical Society, Two West 77th Street, New York, NY 10024./

Wilkeson, Frank. Recollections of a private soldier in the Army of the Potomac. G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1898.

Robertson, William Wallace, Paul C. Robertson and Ruth Robertson. The Civil War diaries of William Wallace Robertson, 1862-1865. 2001
Photocopy of a typescript including excerpts from published texts and maps regarding the 11th New York Battery, family photographs and chart, and a brief 1975 account of a trip by the transcribers to document the locations in the diary. William Wallace Robertson, the son of William M. and Margaret (Bogg) Robertson, was born November 13, 1841 in Putnam, Washington County, New York and died April 27, 1929, in North Tonawanda, Niagara County, New York. He married Mary Elizabeth (Libby) Hawley, (1846-1931).

Unknown. Letter. 9 February 1864.
Letter froman unknown Union soldier, in the 11th New York Battery, writing February 9, 1864. This letter to "Hattie" was written after she responded to his advertisement in a "lonely-hearts" magazine.
Original located at Special Collections, University Libraries (0434) Virginia Tech.
Thank you to Karen Fuhrman for pointing out this resource.

Wyatt, James Taylor. Roster of soldiers and officers of the 11th New York Independent Battery. 1864.
Abstract: List of the names along with age, date of enlistment, and other remarks regarding the military service of those who served the 11th Independent Battery. A portrait of Wyatt is enclosed with this item.
Located at the New York State Library.