7th Artillery Regiment

Nickname: Albany County Regiment; Seymour Guard.

Mustered in as 113th regiment of infantry: August 18, 1862
Designated 7th regiment of artillery (heavy): December 19, 1862
Mustered out: August 1, 1865

The following is taken from New York in the War of the Rebellion, 3rd ed. Frederick Phisterer. Albany: J. B. Lyon Company, 1912.

Col. Lewis O. Morris received, August 1, 1862, authority to recruit a regiment in the, then, 13th Senatorial district of the State. August 19, 1862, the regiment was designated the 113th Regiment of Infantry. It was organized at Albany and there mustered in the service of the United States for three years August 18, 1862. It was converted, December 10, 1862, into an artillery regiment, and December 19, 1862, designated the 7th Regiment of Artillery. Two additional companies were organized for the regiment, and mustered in the United States service for three years, August 6, 1863, and January 19, 1864, respectively. June 16, 1865, the men whose term of service would expire before October 1, 1865, were mustered out, and the regiment, under Co1. Richard C. Duryea, consolidated into a battalion of four companies, A, B, C and D.

The companies were recruited principally: A, B, C, D, E, F, G and I at Albany; H at West Troy; K at Albany, Westerlo, Bethlehem, Rensselaerville and Knox; and Land M in Albany county.

The regiment (ten companies) left the State August 19, 1862, and served as heavy artillery and infantry in the defenses of Washington, north of the Potomac, from August, 1862; in the 2d Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Corps, from February, 1863; in Tyler's Artillery Division, 2d Corps, Army of Potomac, from May 18, 1864; in the 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 2d Corps, from May 29, 1864; in the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 2d Corps, from November 23, 1864; in the 2d Separate Brigade, 8th Corps, from February 25, 1865, at Baltimore, Md. The battalion remaining in service, commanded by Maj. John F. Mount, was honorably discharged and mustered out at Fort Federal Hill, Baltimore, Md., August 1, 1865.

During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 8 officers, 166 enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 6 officers, 115 enlisted men; of disease and other causes, 4 officers, 378 enlisted men; total, 18 officers, 659 enlisted men; aggregate, 677; of whom 4 officers and 213 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy.

The following is taken from The Union army: a history of military affairs in the loyal states, 1861-65 -- records of the regiments in the Union army -- cyclopedia of battles -- memoirs of commanders and soldiers, Volume II: New York, Maryland, West Virginia and Ohio. Madison, WI: Federal Pub. Co., 1908.

Seventh Artillery (Heavy),—Cols., Lewis O. Morris, Joseph S. Conrad, Edward A. Springsteed, Richard C. Duryea; Lieut.-Cols., John Hastings, Edward A. Springsteed, Joseph M. Murphy, John F. Mount; Majs., Edward A. Springsteed, Samuel A. Anable, E. Willard Smith, Francis Pruyn, John F. Mount, Joseph M. Murphy, Abram Sickles, Charles W. Hobbs. This regiment, known as the Albany county regiment, or Seymour Guard, was recruited in the summer of 1862 by Col. Morris and was first designated the 113th infantry. It rendezvoused at Albany and was there mustered into the U. S. service for three years, Aug. 18, 1862. It was changed to an artillery regiment on Dec. 19, and two new companies were organized and attached to the regiment, one on Aug. 6, 1863, and the other on Jan. 19, 1864. The whole command was recruited in the county of Albany. On June 26, 1865, all members whose terms would expire Oct. 1, 1865, were mustered out and the regiment was consolidated into a battalion of four companies under Col. Duryea. This battalion, commanded by Maj. Mount, was mustered out at Federal hill, Baltimore, Aug. 1, 1865. This regiment is included by Col. Fox, "Regimental Losses in the Civil War," in his list of three hundred fighting regiments. He says: "It moved to Washington, Aug. 19, 1862, where it was immediately assigned to duty in the forts near the city. * * * The 7th remained on garrison duty in various forts near Washington until May 15, 1864, when it was ordered to the front to serve as infantry. It marched out of Washington with 67 officers, 6 non-commissioned staff and 1,768 muskets, joining Grant's army at Spottsylvania May 17th. It was assigned to Tyler's division, but was transferred a few days later to Barlow's splendid division, and at one time—in September, 1864, it was attached to the famous Irish brigade. It served with Barlow until Feb. 22, 1865, when it was withdrawn from the front and ordered to Baltimore, where it garrisoned Fort McHenry until after the close of the war. During its first hundred days of service in the field—from Spottsylvania to Reams' station—the 7th lost 1,254 in killed, wounded and missing. The casualties at Cold Harbor, including the loss in the trenches, amounted to 45 killed, 259 wounded, and 114 missing, a total of 418. Col. Morris was killed there the day after the assault, while passing along the trenches. He was an officer of the regular army and a son of the Capt. Morris who was killed at Monterey." Among other extraordinary losses incurred by the regiment were 135 killed, wounded and missing at Totopotomy, 501 in the assaults on Petersburg in June, and 94 at Reams' station. It ranks third among the nine heavy artillery regiments which sustained the greatest loss in killed and mortally wounded in the war, having lost 14 officers and 277 men, or a total of 291; 4 officers and 378 men died of disease and other causes, a total of 677, of whom 2 officers and 214 men died as prisoners.Seventh Artillery (Heavy),—Cols., Lewis O. Morris, Joseph S. Conrad, Edward A. Springsteed, Richard C. Duryea; Lieut.-Cols., John Hastings, Edward A. Springsteed, Joseph M. Murphy, John F. Mount; Majs., Edward A. Springsteed, Samuel A. Anable, E. Willard Smith, Francis Pruyn, John F. Mount, Joseph M. Murphy, Abram Sickles, Charles W. Hobbs. This regiment, known as the Albany county regiment, or Seymour Guard, was recruited in the summer of 1862 by Col. Morris and was first designated the 113th infantry. It rendezvoused at Albany and was there mustered into the U. S. service for three years, Aug. 18, 1862. It was changed to an artillery regiment on Dec. 19, and two new companies were organized and attached to the regiment, one on Aug. 6, 1863, and the other on Jan. 19, 1864. The whole command was recruited in the county of Albany. On June 26, 1865, all members whose terms would expire Oct. 1, 1865, were mustered out and the regiment was consolidated into a battalion of four companies under Col. Duryea. This battalion, commanded by Maj. Mount, was mustered out at Federal hill, Baltimore, Aug. 1, 1865. This regiment is included by Col. Fox, "Regimental Losses in the Civil War," in his list of three hundred fighting regiments. He says: "It moved to Washington, Aug. 19, 1862, where it was immediately assigned to duty in the forts near the city. * * * The 7th remained on garrison duty in various forts near Washington until May 15, 1864, when it was ordered to the front to serve as infantry. It marched out of Washington with 67 officers, 6 non-commissioned staff and 1,768 muskets, joining Grant's army at Spottsylvania May 17th. It was assigned to Tyler's division, but was transferred a few days later to Barlow's splendid division, and at one time—in September, 1864, it was attached to the famous Irish brigade. It served with Barlow until Feb. 22, 1865, when it was withdrawn from the front and ordered to Baltimore, where it garrisoned Fort McHenry until after the close of the war. During its first hundred days of service in the field—from Spottsylvania to Reams' station—the 7th lost 1,254 in killed, wounded and missing. The casualties at Cold Harbor, including the loss in the trenches, amounted to 45 killed, 259 wounded, and 114 missing, a total of 418. Col. Morris was killed there the day after the assault, while passing along the trenches. He was an officer of the regular army and a son of the Capt. Morris who was killed at Monterey." Among other extraordinary losses incurred by the regiment were 135 killed, wounded and missing at Totopotomy, 501 in the assaults on Petersburg in June, and 94 at Reams' station. It ranks third among the nine heavy artillery regiments which sustained the greatest loss in killed and mortally wounded in the war, having lost 14 officers and 277 men, or a total of 291; 4 officers and 378 men died of disease and other causes, a total of 677, of whom 2 officers and 214 men died as prisoners.

NYSMM Online Resources

Battles and Casualties from Phisterer (pdf)
Battles and Casualties from Phisterer (spreadsheet)

Muster Roll

Unit Roster

Newspaper Clippings
 

Other Resources

This is meant to be a comprehensive list. If, however, you know of a resource that is not listed below, please send an email to ng.ny.nyarng.list.historians@mail.mil with the name of the resource and where it is located. This can include photographs, letters, articles and other non-book materials. Also, if you have any materials in your possession that you would like to donate, the museum is always looking for items specific to New York's military heritage. Thank you.

Army Record of Morton Havens. 1 p.

Huested, Alfred B. War record of famous Albany Regiment of 1862 : History that was read by Dr. A. B. Huested at the reunion of 100 survivors on the occasion of the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the old 113th Regiment, later known as the Seventh Heavy Artillery. 1912.

Keating, Robert. Carnival of Blood: the Civil War Ordeal of the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery. Baltimore: Butternut and Blue: 1998.

Lockley, Frederick E. Letters of Fred Lockley, Union soldier, 1864--65. Edited by John E. Pomfret. Huntington library quarterly XVI (1952/53) 75-112.

Six colored views : Camps of New York regiments during the Civil War.
[6] leaves of plates : chiefly col. ill. ; 27 x 37 cm.
Contents: Fort Ethan Allen, Garrisoned by the 4th N.Y. Heavy Artillery. Col. D. Doubleday, Commdg. -- Camp Pomroy, 111th Regiment, New York. Col. J. Segoine, Commdg.-- Camp Chase, 147th Regt. N.Y.S.V. Col. A.S. Warner, Commdg. -- Fort Pennsylvania, Head Quarters of the 113th Regt. N.Y.S.V. Col. O.L. Morricee, Commdg. -- Camp Seward, 170th N.Y.V. 2d Regiment, Corcoran's Legion, Col. Peter McDermott, Lieut. Col. J.P. McIvor -- Camp Hathaway, 141st Regt. N.Y.S.V.S.G. Hathaway, Col. Commanding.
Located at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Smith, Sylvester. Letters to Mary E. Smith,1862-1865
The collection consists of letters from Sylvester Smith with Company E of the 113th New York Infantry Regiment, and then the 7th New York Artillery Regiment, to his wife Mary E. Smith, of Oak Hill, Greene County, New York from 1862-1865. Smith wrote from Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington (D.C.) and his letters document his involvement in the battles of Cold Harbor and Petersburg Crater, Virginia. Among other topics discussed in the letters are Smith's opinions of the Southern people and their outrages, comfortable camp life and accommodations, other soldiers, money matters, his wife's correspondence, and her problems coping with his extended absence.108 items.
Located at the University of Georgia.

 

Items in the museum collection are in bold.